2024 World Malaria Day: “Accelerate the fight against malaria for a more equitable world.”World Malaria Day is a Day to come together, to raise awareness of the fight to end malaria and also to shine a light on the challenges we face in eliminating this devastating disease. Let’s hear every Voice.

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2024 World Malaria Day: “Accelerate the fight against malaria for a more equitable world.”
World Malaria Day is a pivotal moment in the calendar for the malaria community. It is a chance to come together, to raise awareness of the fight to end malaria and also to shine a light on the challenges we have in eliminating this devastating disease.

Not only does this disease directly endanger health it also perpetuates a cycle of inequity. The disease disproportionately disadvantages those communities and social groups that are already facing economic, societal and health challenges.

Of course, it is also deadly. Globally in 2022, there were 608 000 malaria deaths in 85 countries. The African continent carries a disproportionately high share of the global malaria burden. In 2022, the continent was home to 94% of malaria cases (233 million) and 95% (580 000) of malaria deaths.

Gender, Health Equity, and Human Rights

Accelerating the fight against Malaria is a collective effort. Together, we can break down barriers, advocate for the vulnerable, and ensure inclusivity in pursuing a malaria-free world. The goal must extend beyond combating disease to championing the rights of every individual to lead a healthy and dignified life.

Zero Malaria begins with everyone speaking up. Every voice, whether advocating locally or urging leaders to act, is crucial in the fight against malaria.
Let’s recommit to strengthening health systems, women and girls, and pursuing equity in the fight against Malaria. The voice of Africa Fighting Malaria (AFM) in her book “Excellent Powder: DDT‘s Political and Scientific Histor” must be heard.

Mr Akin Ojo said he resorted to taking herbal medicines when he was diagnosed with malaria because he could not afford antimalarial drugs at the pharmacy.

“When taking those medications, you have to eat well. They will still tell you to buy Panadol or Paracetamol and, by the time you calculate everything, you will see that people like us cannot afford it,” he lamented.

In 2023, the former Minister of Health, Dr Osagie Ehanire, said an estimated 55 million cases of malaria and nearly 90,000 malaria deaths occur each year in Nigeria.

Ehanire noted that the economic burden of malaria in Nigeria was estimated at $1.6bn (N687bn) in 2022 and may increase to about $2.8bn (N2tn) in 2030.

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